Tuesday, July 16, 2024

Ne Obliviscaris balance emotion and technical proficiency with Exul

Australian progressive metal up-and-comers Ne Obliviscaris return with their long-awaited album fourth, Exul. Despite delays from the pandemic, the Prog community has been foaming at the mouth for this record and for good reason; it is an absolute masterwork of extreme metal.

The grand scope of the album is immensely impressive and the massive run times make for a daunting experience, the sprawling two-part epic; ‘Misericorde’ clocks in at 16 minutes and every single instrument has a glorious moment to shine including the signature violin sections from clean vocalist Tim Charles. This song also boasts some of the most amazing guitar work you could possibly find, it’s a perfect balance of overwrought emotion and laser-guided technical precision and it’s a highlight of the record.

The violin gives the album a more sombre feeling throughout the album and tracks like ‘Graal’ utilise it more as a tone setter when it isn’t being used as a lead instrument or as the focal melody maker. Ne Obliviscaris is a study in contrast, Xenoyr’s harsh vocals contrast with Tim Charles’ angelic voice in the same way that the crushing guitar work and drumming contrast with the emotive violin work making for a constantly evolving experience, something that is starting to become more elusive in the Prog scene as the tech arms race continues.

While the band focus more on building atmosphere, there are still moments of jaw-dropping technical proficiency with ‘Graal’ containing some colossal sweep-picking segments as well as drummer Dan Presland’s marathon-like double bass section at the end of the song which leads into the haunting outro track ‘Anhedonia’. ‘Anhedonia’ should become the new rebuttal to the claim that Prog is all about technical proficiency and has no use for soul and emotion. The anguish-filled wailing from Tim accompanied by sorrowful violin work and plodding minor keys makes a song that would likely have been overlooked due to its lack of heavy instrumentation into a highlight of the record.

Ne Obliviscaris have yet to become the flavour of the month in the way that some other bands have but hopefully, this will be the record that gives them the success and respect that they so clearly deserve.

Exul is available March 24th via Season of Mist.

Lamestream Lydia
Lamestream Lydia
Self-proclaimed journalist, Progressive rock enthusiast and the most American sounding person you're ever likely to meet in the North of England

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Australian progressive metal up-and-comers Ne Obliviscaris return with their long-awaited album fourth, Exul. Despite delays from the pandemic, the Prog community has been foaming at the mouth for this record and for good reason; it is an absolute masterwork of extreme metal. The grand scope...Ne Obliviscaris balance emotion and technical proficiency with Exul