Alter Bridge – Live at the Royal Albert Hall Featuring The Parallax Orchestra

When it comes to venues, there are few that are as impressive as the Royal Albert Hall, from the striking design both outside and in, the variety of entertainment it has hosted, and not to mention the history of it. When beginning viewing of this release, we start en route to the place with Myles Kennedy, soon to find ourselves being treated to some backstage setting up and prep while the discussion of how the idea behind this performance came about. Impressively captured, Alter Bridge bring to life 21 tracks with The Parallax Orchestra recorded over two performances. No fancy backdrops, no flashy lighting and smoke machines, no gimmicks, just the band, the orchestra and the stage. This is all about the music and the performance. A perfect encapsulation.

Unlike most live releases, the video is broken up to really get into the workings of how such a performance becomes, the devotion is really brought to light, how to find the right orchestra, the right parts, the right attitude. It isn’t strictly focussed around Alter Bridge either, taking in the time to talk of the challenges and work required for the orchestral composures. The breakups between songs are similar to Machine Heads Elegies release, non-intrusive, although more common.

The videography has been done extremely well, rich and sharp, great angles and more impressive slow panning shots like you’ll ever find in a Michael Bay film. There is plenty of focus on the crowd and orchestra without taking away from the band itself, that makes plenty of use of the stage and prove exactly why they are fit to perform in such prestigious ways, everything is clear and mixed well, you genuinely cannot ask for more. For those there, those that couldn’t make it, those that love the band and those that know little about them, this makes for the perfect purchase. The only struggle to witness through the entire show is the crowd singing over those performing, watching this is worthy of every minute you lose yourself in it.

Alter Bridge: Live At The Royal Albert Hall will be available across multiple formats and bundles including Vinyl, CD, DVD, Blu-ray and digitally from September 7th via Napalm Records.

Two-disc track listing:

1. Slip To The Void

2. Addicted To Pain

3. Before Tomorrow Comes

4. The Writing On The Wall

5. Cry Of Achilles

6. In Loving Memory

7. Fortress

8. Ties That Bind

9. The Other Side

10. Brand New Start

11. Ghost of Days Gone By

1. The Last Hero

2. The End is Here

3. Words Darker Than Their Wings

4. Waters Rising

5. Lover

6. Wonderful Life – Watch Over You

7. This Side of Fate

8. Broken Wings

9. Blackbird

10. Open Your Eyes.

When it comes to venues, there are few that are as impressive as the Royal Albert Hall, from the striking design both outside and in, the variety of entertainment it has hosted, and not to mention the history of it. When beginning viewing of this release, we start en route to the place with Myles Kennedy, soon to find ourselves being treated to some backstage setting up and prep while the discussion of how the idea behind this performance came about. Impressively captured, Alter Bridge bring to life 21 tracks with The Parallax Orchestra recorded over two performances. No fancy…

Review Overview

Summary : This makes for the perfect purchase. The only struggle to witness through the entire show is the crowd singing over those performing, watching this is worthy of every minute you lose yourself in it.

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About Ash Crowson

Guitarist, photographer, geek, gamer, full on metalhead and allround barfly, if i'm not at work, a gig or studying for my degree, you'll find me at the bar! A fascination with second world war history and military aviation. All with a very dry humour to round me off!

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