Tuesday, April 16, 2024

Touche Amore Broadens their Sonic Spectrum on ‘Lament’

Lament, Touche Amore’s Ross Robinson-produced fifth album, which is their follow up to the hugely celebrated Stage Four, expands their sonic palette and delivers an album full of everything that Touche are best at.

Going into this record, Touche were already in a position where their previous album had reached the upper ends of many end-of-decade lists, which is often a difficult thing to follow up. The record begins urgently, with the frenetic post-hardcore of ‘Come Heroine’ proving straight out of the gate that none of their pace has been lost, with an impassioned vocal delivery paired with d-beat drums to launch you into the record headlong. 

Touche have expanded their songwriting depth on Lament too. Their longest song, ‘Limelight,’ can be found on this record — which is a far cry from the sub one-minute ragers on their previous album …To The Beat of a Dead Horse. Andy Hull’s additional vocals on the end of Limelight contrast beautifully with Jeremy Bolm’s bark to create one of the emotional climaxes of the record.

Instrumentally, there are a few new elements to the band’s sound. The bass playing on this record takes on a New Order-esque quality, especially in the verses of ‘Limelight.‘ The inclusion of slide guitar at various points is a welcome addition to Touche’s sonic palette, and this is especially used tastefully through ‘A Broadcast’ to great effect.

Lament takes the experience of Stage Four and brings it forward as a source of subject matter onto this one. For example, ‘I’ll Be Your Host‘ talks of Jeremy Bolm’s experience meeting fans who have been through personal tragedy, and his reaction to that. It’s a very meta premise for a song, but is dealt with deft lyrics and emotional delivery. The spoken word intro to ‘Forecast‘ is the most direct Jeremy Bolm’s lyrics get here, which is an achievement given the general candour and concision of his style throughout their career. The song gives way to an emotionally charged final piece, ending on a repeating drum part that ties the whole album together and provides a fitting final motif.

Lament might not top Stage Four, one of the high watermarks of post-hardcore as a genre, but it’s essential listening for any fan. It’s a blend of emotionally wrought lyrics and post-hardcore instrumentals mixed in with more anthemic tendencies that deliver some of the best songs of Touche’s career.

Lament was released on 9th October via Epitaph Records.

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Lament, Touche Amore’s Ross Robinson-produced fifth album, which is their follow up to the hugely celebrated Stage Four, expands their sonic palette and delivers an album full of everything that Touche are best at. Going into this record, Touche were already in a position where...Touche Amore Broadens their Sonic Spectrum on 'Lament'